Updates: January 2021

An empty stage. A ghost light on a table and two chairs. The house at half. Intermission…still…

 

UPDATES FOR READERS OF “THE BUSINESS OF BROADWAY”

 

January, 2021

 

COVID-19 PANDEMIC IS STILL THE ONLY INFLUENCE THAT MATTERS IN 2021.

Chapter 12: Surprises

Los Angeles Times- ” In ways large and small, the theater is, quite literally, behind some of the best movies and TV shows of 2020. But even with countless venues across the country sitting dark since government-mandated shutdowns because of COVID-19, the theater industry has profoundly shaped the year in culture. Even from the comfort of my couch, I owe the theater a debt of gratitude. We all do. I’m not even counting live recordings of stage shows.”

Chapter 15: Actors / Chapter 22: Theatre Owners

“After months of development, Actors Equity has published four new worksheets detailing Covid-19 safety guidelines for live productions. … Equity’s safety team has created detailed instructions arranged according to the four types of productions commonly seen currently: outdoor with an audience, outdoor without an audience, indoor with an audience and indoor without an audience.”

Chapter 25: Summary

From the Authors: “The 2020/21 pandemic has revealed the vulnerability of live performances in ways that we did not contemplate in decades past. When NYC was attacked on Sept 11, 2001, when AIDS decimated the talent pool that theatre relied on, during World Wars and with electrical blackouts and domestic protests, “normal” American life was disrupted. Broadway shows fought back, losing perhaps a few performances, but no more. After a year and a half of closures or more, it is estimated that most Broadway shows will require 3-4 months advance notice to prepare, rehearse, and more importantly, market their shows to local theatregoers, with the eventual hope of attracting tourists who may or may not return in full for a few years. Broadway can not return in a wink. Broadway is resilient and live theatre is essential to many of us. Economically, New York City relies on tourists, and many tourists come to NYC to see Broadway shows. The future is not bleak, but “the norm” is also not promised in the immediate years. Some leaders are suggesting that smaller regional theatres will return first. Jobs may move to smaller cities. The best advice right now is to “go with the flow” and follow the jobs. Ultimately, the standard will still be Broadway. It just may not feel the same until 2025-ish.”

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